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Dr. Lee E. Brown


Lee E. Brown, EdD, CSCS*D, FNSCA, FACSM

Professor

Location: KHS 233
Telephone: (657) 278-4605
Email: leebrown@fullerton.edu

 

Advising Area:
Clinical Exercise Science; Fitness and Health Promotion; Special Studies; Sport Studies: Performance Enhancement/Sport Psychology

Course Taught:
KNES 320: Exercise Technique for Strength Training
KNES 349: Measurement and Statistics in Kinesiology
KNES 351: Principles of Strength and Conditioning
KNES 400: Program Design
KNES 508: Statistics in Kinesiology
KNES 510: Research Methods in Kinesiology
KNES 555: Applied Strength and Conditioning

Biosketch:
Dr. Brown was born in Northern California but raised in Los Angeles. While in high school, he competed in basketball and volleyball. He received his B.S. in physical education from East Tennessee State University in Johnson City, Tennessee. He completed his graduate work and obtained his Ed.D. from Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, Florida. While a graduate assistant, he was responsible for isokinetic performance testing specifically designed to determine human responses to high velocity training. Dr. Brown joined the faculty at Cal State Fullerton in 2002 and is the current Director of the Human Performance Laboratory and the Center for Sport Performance. Prior to coming to California, he spent two years at Arkansas State University in Jonesboro, Arkansas as director of the Human Performance Laboratory. Before Arkansas he was in Florida for 16 years serving as Research Director for an Orthopedic surgeon’s office and teaching and coaching at the public school level. He was President of the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) and is a Fellow of both the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and the NSCA. He also served as President of the NSCA Foundation overseeing a four million dollar endowment.

Interest Area:
Sport performance, anaerobic assessment and high velocity neuromuscular adaptations.

Current projects:
Limb acceleration and its generic components; Postactivation potentiation responses to assisted and resisted jumping; the effects of different warm-up protocols on sprinting, vertical jumping, kicking, throwing velocity and baseball bat swing speed; one vs. two stair climb training; effect of different footwear on vertical jumping; whole body vibration as a warm-up and aerobic activity as a recovery method for exercise induced muscle soreness.

Department of Kinesiology

800 North State College Blvd.,
Fullerton, California 92834
Room KHS-121,
Phone: (657) 278-3316
Fax: (657) 278-5317